Mental Health Matter

Published and last updated 8
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When you're feeling down, it's really important to know you're not by yourself. Even when things are tough, remember this: God loves you no matter what. Knowing this can help you feel better when things seem really dark. Keep believing that there's always love and support, even when life is hard.

Introduction

In the Philippines, lots of people are dealing with mental health issues, but not enough attention is given to it. Mental health problems affect everyone, no matter their age. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), around 2.3 million Filipinos are dealing with depression, and 4.5 million have anxiety disorders. Even younger people, between 18 and 24 years old, are facing these problems. 

These numbers might get even higher in the future. Some reasons for this could be parents not being around enough, families breaking apart, and everyone being so caught up in technology. As society changes, it's crucial to pay more attention to mental health and take action to support each other.

Understanding Mental Well-being: Depression vs. Anxiety

When our minds feel good, we can do lots of things well and be part of our community. Depression and anxiety make our minds feel bad, but they do it differently. Depression feels like a never-ending sadness that takes away the happiness from things we enjoy. It can make us feel very alone. Anxiety is about worrying a lot about things that might happen in the future, even if they haven't happened yet.

These feelings can make our bodies act differently. Depression might change how we eat and sleep, making us tired all the time. Anxiety can make our heart beat fast, make us sweat, or feel shaky.

Thinking gets hard with depression or anxiety. It makes it tough to think clearly or make choices. With anxiety, our thoughts race, and we struggle to focus.Our feelings and what we do change too. Depression might make us feel guilty or worthless, while anxiety might make us avoid things that scare us. 

Depression usually sticks around for a while, but anxiety can be short-term or last a long time if we don't get help. Dealing with both can be hard, but it's important to ask for help. Professionals understand and can help us feel better. Taking care of our minds is just as important as taking care of our bodies for a good, healthy life.

Practical Steps to Reduce the Risk of Developing Anxiety and Depression

To feel better and reduce worry and sadness, try these simple things. First, take care of yourself by sleeping well, eating good food, and moving around. This helps your brain feel happier. Try calming activities like meditation or taking deep breaths when you're stressed. 

Make friends and family a big part of your life for support. Avoid things that stress you out and plan your time smartly to not feel too much pressure. Do things that make you happy, and if you need help, talk to someone or try therapy to learn how to handle tough times.

Conclusion

When you're feeling down, it's really important to know you're not by yourself. Even when things are tough, remember this: God loves you no matter what. Knowing this can help you feel better when things seem really dark. Keep believing that there's always love and support, even when life is hard. This idea can be like a strong rope holding you steady during tough times, reminding you that you're important, you're cared for, and you're never really alone.


Tags

#mental health #weekly talks

Author

Glenda Baloca

Glenda Baloca

Performance Marketing

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